Brebis Gnocchi Recipe

Chef Corey Dilts turned brebis, our soft, chevre-style cheese, into gnocchi, and kindly provided his recipe!

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Brebis Gnocchi
Serves 2-3
Prep time: 30 minutes
Cook time: 5 minutes

Ingredients:

2 cups brebis from The Friendly Ewe
1 cup finely grated pecorino romano
2 duck eggs (also available at The Friendly Ewe)
1 1/2 cup semolina pasta flour, plus some extra for rolling, available at Fare Share Coop
2 teaspoons salt
1) Beat eggs together.  Thoroughly combine eggs into brebis cheese and mix until smooth.
2)  Gently fold the flour, grated cheese, and salt into egg and cheese mixture, being careful to not over mix the dough.  It should be soft and a little on the wet side.
3) Using extra flour to dust board as needed, roll into logs about 3/4″ thick and cut with a sharp knife.  Optional: Gently roll each ‘pillow’ over the tines of a fork to give a texture that will help hold sauce.
4) Bring a large pot of water to a rolling boil.  Add a generous amount of salt (in Italy they say for the pasta water to be “salty like the ocean”).  Add gnocchi to water and stir very gently to prevent them from sticking.  They will first sink but then rise to the top as they near completion.  Let them float at the top for 30 seconds, and then using a slotted spoon, skim finished gnocchi from the water and add to the sauce of your choosing!
Gnocchi can be cooked fresh or laid out in a single layer on a floured tray and frozen.  Once frozen, they can be transferred into a bag and kept frozen.  Cook directly from frozen – do not thaw.
Where does the name “brebis” come from? Chevre simply means “goat” in French. This cheese is similar to chevre, but comes from sheep’s milk, so we chose brebis, which means “sheep” in French.

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